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Travel Insurance

Tip #7– Which? Holiday advice to people affected by volcanic disruption
Who do I submit my claim to?

Your flight, with an EU based airline, was cancelled and the airline made alternative plans for your travel:
If your airline is based in the EU, the airline must, by law, refund you for reasonable costs incurred during the delay to your journey. They must refund reasonable costs involved in buying food or refreshment; two telephone calls, emails or faxes; hotel accommodation in cases where one or more nights’ stay is necessary; and any transport costs. There is no upper limit on the amount of money passengers can claim back, although all costs should be reasonable in relation to the waiting time.
Make sure you keep all receipts, and send a copy of these receipts to your airline, along with full contact details and any booking reference you may have.
Unfortunately, if your airline was based outside the EU you may not have the same protection. This is because the cancellation rights under the European regulations apply only if you are flying from an EU airport, or from an airport outside the EU, to an EU airport, on an EU carrier.
However, all airlines will have their own policy on what they will be doing in terms of compensating their customers, and customers should contact their airline to find out what they can claim for.
If your flight was cancelled but you chose to take a refund and make your own travel arrangements:
The airline must refund you the cost of your ticket. However, after that they have no duty of care to you. Call your travel insurer to find out what their policy is on refunding customers for costs incurred in making alternative travel plans before making those plans. According to the Association of British Insurers, there is no Act of God exclusion in travel insurance policies. Insurers should not reject your claim on these grounds; however, some have other exclusions, which they may claim exempts them from paying compensation to passengers affected (e.g. some insurers are not paying out because they believe this falls under their definition of a ‘natural disaster’).
If you have already travelled but didn’t first call your insurer, it is still worth submitting your receipts. Many insurance companies are taking claims on a case by case basis and may refund you for extra costs. Again, these should be for reasonable expenses.
If you do not have travel insurance, or if you were on a flight with a non-EU based airline, and paid by credit card:
All airlines will have their own policy on what they will be doing in terms of compensating their customers, and customers should contact their airline to find out what they can claim for.
However, if you paid for your trip on a credit card it may be possible to claim back the original cost of your cancelled flights from your credit card provider under Section 75 of the Consumer Credit Act.
More information can be found at www.which.co.uk/volcano

Tip #6– Your travel insurance does not cover every disaster!
Which? Holiday urges the travel insurance industry to up its game

Tip #8– Don’t let ear pain cast a cloud over your air travel
Almost 70% of Britons experience health problems when flying

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New TSA Passenger information

Executive Traveller 2003